Fit Brains

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Rosetta Stone Fit Brains

Fit Brains Trainer is an award-winning personalized game library that challenges your brains various cognitive & emotional functionalities. The library contains 60+ games, can generate 500+ workout sessions & provides in-depth performance reports. It is available on a wide variety of mobile devices and is features on the devices in Apple Stores across the world. Finally it is currently a Editor's Choice on the app store.


Available on the App Store, Google Play, and FitBrains.com


Responsibilities

This is my first job as a Game Designer. Throughout my roughly two years I've lead and participated in a wide variety of roles. I'll break down some of them in chronological order instead of writing a reflection.


Rebalancing Fit Brains for Apple TV

My first task as a designer was to balance a collection of games which were going to be ported at to the Apple TV. We received a launch exclusive with Apple for the platform which made the project time sensitive.The challenge of the balancing came from change of player input. Our games are made to be played on a touch screen and the controller for the TV offered two analog buttons. Difficulty curves and user experience needed to be reformulated around this. I found a solution by comparing scores from the Iphone and TV version then seeing what the differences between the scores were and rebalancing the difficulty of the TV's games accordingly. This was my first launched title at Rosetta Stone.


Reacting to the FFC/Lumosity Settelment

This was probably the most interesting work I did while at Rosetta Stone. In January 2016, the news broke that our competitor Lumosity had to Pay $2 Million to Settle FTC Deceptive Advertising Charges for Its marketing of their "Brain Training" Program. This created an industry wide shock. As a response to this, I was put in charge of auditing our games to ensure that we were not making any exaggerated claims about the benefits of our product similar to our competitor. Thankfully, after performing a thorough scan, I found no wording which came close to the scale of what Lumosity was claiming. Following this we did change certain wording which we thought could be misconstrued such as changing words like training and performance.


Created and maintained a wiki

This one is pretty straight forward, Once the dust cleared from the Lumosity turmoil. I had a full comprehension of our game. I then used this familiarity to establish a wikipedia for our games. In it I detailed how each of the games worked, what parts of the brain they trained and release notes so we could track critical changes which could affect our research data.


Creating a pipeline for a massive art update

Once the lawsuit scare blew over, we resumed our game wide art update for both IOS and Our HTML5 Client. Our library contains over 60 games each of which needed new art. throughout this project, I worked with our outsourced graphics team 5 minutes and our internal developer team to establish a pipeline which would take the art from the Adobe Illustrator files and re size them to the various dimensions that the programmers required.


Quality Assurance for the restructuring of our Android Port

Once we updated all of the art on the IOS version of our game, we decided we should also update the Android port of our game. This required an entire overhaul of the game and extensive Quality Assurance testing to optimize performance and ensure that the user experience was unaltered during the porting.


Designing games which test emotional intelligence and the promote basic game literacy

The most valuable lessons I learned from working on this project involved framing my game design methodologies through the context of challenging emotional and cognitive intelligence. This may seem rudimentary, as these two things are the foundation of all videogames, but it's the context in which I executed them which was valuable. This was my first paid design position, and in many ways it cemented my foundational knowledge of how to create and teach game literacy. The audience of Fit Brains is not a group that is well versed in the language of play. For many of them, this is their only formal experience with game systems. Providing games which challenge emotional intelligence within the constraints of basic game literacy has been an incredibly rewarding experience.


Analysing the effects of braintraining games on wounded veterans

Outside of the free market, Fit Brains is used by the American Military. American Veterans recovering from brain injuries in Head Trauma Wards play the games we develop in order to recover their cognitive abilities. I worked with the doctors from the ward to put together a report on the benefits of Brain Fitness games on the recovery of soldiers.


In The Media

A Workout for Your Brain, on Your Smartphone - The New York Times

Maintain Your Memory With Brain Fitness Games - mashable.com

Which Brain Games Will Help Your Brain the Most? - discovermagazine.com